Double Feature

The Long Goodbye

The Black Bird

The Long Goodbye

While our allotment of advance tickets has sold out online, additional tickets will be available to purchase at the door each  night of the show on a first come, first serve basis.

Elliott Gould is a rumpled, rambling version of Raymond Chandler’s white knight Phillip Marlowe in The Long Goodbye, Robert Altman’s free-spirited adaptation of the iconic detective tale. A private eye out of time in the hippy Hollywood Hills of the early 70’s, Marlowe ingrains himself in a twisted mystery to save a long-time (and newlydead) friend’s reputation. Sterling Hayden co-stars as a neurotic, violent Hemingwayesque writer whose alcohol-addled memory may hold the key to Marlowe’s mystery. This hazy, slipstream noir was a major influence on The Big Lebowski, and even features a Jewish gangster who’s loathe to handle business on Shabbat.

“Raymond Chandler’s sentimental foolishness is the taking-off place for Robert Altman’s heady, whirling sideshow of a movie, set in the early-seventies L.A. of the stoned sensibility.” – Pauline Kael, The New Yorker

“Altman’s achievement has been to make a tough, funny, hugely entertaining movie that acknowledges its Chandler origins without ever turning into an anachronism… It’s an original work, complex without being obscure, visually breathtaking without seeming to be inappropriately fancy.” – Vincent Canby, The New York Times

Kim Morgan interviews Elliott Gould for the New Beverly blog.

Director
Robert Altman
Starring
Elliott Gould, Nina van Pallandt, Sterling Hayden, Mark Rydell, Henry Gibson, David Arkin
Year
1973
Rated
R
Country
USA
Format
35mm
Running Time
112 minutes

The Black Bird

George Segal’s leading man good looks combined with a comic’s rubber faced expressions, kept him in such high demand during the 1970’s, that he appeared in a film released every year during that decade, and in The Black Bird (1975) – a send up of The Maltese Falcon (1941) – his talent and charm are on full display. After Sam Spade starts flying the tombstone kite, his son Sam Spade Jr. (George Segal) inherits his father’s San Francisco detective agency, complete with its wry secretary Effie Perine (Lee Patrick reprising her role as Humphrey Bogart’s secretary from Falcon). When Sam Jr. is approached to buy his father’s iconic bird, he soon finds himself pursued by a beautiful Russian seductress who wants the Falcon, “smashed” by Hawaiian tough guys, and interrogated by a bald Nazi midget who has “killed for it” and “will kill again for it.” With all the hilarious heat the statuette is bringing Sam Spade Jr., perhaps the Black Bird is the big score he’s been waiting for. After all, “superficial minds have never understood the falcon.”

“The general tenor of the film shows a sentimental empathy for the original material with no heartless put-downs marring the work. There are lots of smiles, many chuckles, and a few strong laughs.” – Variety

Director
David Giler
Starring
George Segal, Stéphane Audran, Lionel Stander, Lee Patrick, Elisha Cook Jr
Year
1975
Rated
PG
Country
USA
Format
35mm
Running Time
97 minutes

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